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Weight Loss Mastery – 54 ways success

Try to add as many of these tips to your daily routine, and you will surely be well on the way to a slimmer, healthier you. We don’t get fat “overnight” – so you should expect it to take a certain amount of time to lose that weight again, but don’t give up! Persistence, Determination and Grit – They should be your watchwords. These tips work – if you stick to your plan!

1.    Eliminate one tablespoon of fat a day and you will lose 10 pounds in a year.
2.    Avoid strange fad diets—if you can’t eat that way for the rest of your life, don’t waste your time or your health.
3.    Limit alcohol consumption – each serving contains 100 to 150 calories.
4.    Eat fruit at least twice a day.
5.    Keep a food diary about your food choices, indicating how hungry you are each time you eat. Pay particular attention to your level of hunger when you snack.
6.    Perform aerobic exercise a minimum of 30 minutes three times a week. Log this on your food diary. Aerobic means any exercise that increases your breathing and heart rate. Walking is fine! Do only what you can to begin with. If you have other health problems, consult your doctor before embarking on any strong physical exercise.
7.    Gradually increase the length and frequency of your workouts.
8.    Weigh yourself no more than twice a week. And do it in the morning after going to the bathroom – it’s the most accurate reading.
9.    Give yourself a non-food reward for every 5 pounds lost.
10.    Slow down your eating speed—make meals last at least 20 minutes. Try eating with the other hand or taking a sip of water between bites.
11.    Use smaller plates.
12.    Bring your lunch to work at least three times a week.
13.    Start to strength train twice a week as your fitness improves. Building muscle increases your metabolism and forces your body to use fat, not muscle, when you’re cutting back on calories. Cut down on carbohydrates and stick to lean white meat and fish, and you will notice vast improvements here.
14.    Stop eating while watching television.
15.    Have someone else put away leftovers.
16.    Buy a good low-fat, low-calorie cookbook or magazine subscription.
17.    Try two new reduced-calorie recipes a month.
18.    IMPORTANT – Eat breakfast daily. This suppresses the appetite for most of the day and provides fuel for the brain while at work or looking after the kids! You will feel better and have more energy all day if you eat a low fat cereal in the morning.
19.    Don’t read while eating.
20.    Have a sweet treat once a week.
21.    Keep healthful snacks at home and at work.
22.    Limit your cheese consumption to reduce fat and saturated fat—use cheese and lunchmeat with less than 5 grams of fat per ounce.
23.    Add calorie counting or fat-gram counting to your food diary for a few weeks if your weight loss is slowing down. Maybe you’re missing something.
24.    Substitute herbs and spices for salt.
25.    Shop for food when you are not hungry, and use a shopping list.
26.    Replace ground beef with ground turkey or soy crumbles in dishes such as spaghetti. Don’t skip the protein in your meals; find a leaner substitute.
27.    Eat three vegetables a day.
28.    Always eat sitting down.
29.    Request that your family and friends respect your efforts to lose weight and get fit—beware of loving “sabotage.”
30.    Take a walk when you’re stressed or angry.
31.    Eat two dairy products a day—be aware of your calcium intake. Select low-fat or nonfat dairy products to reduce fat calories.
32.    Order dressings and sauces on the side and apply them with a fork.
33.    Increase your fiber intake—chose whole-grain breads, cereals and pasta products, legumes, and raw fruits and vegetables.
34.    Add slow-down food to your meals—crunchy vegetables, a large glass of water, hot soup or beverages, or fresh fruit to fill you up.
35.    Cook with chicken broth, nonstick cooking spray, wine or water.
36.    Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.
37.    Shrink portion sizes of meats and starches, and pile on the vegetables.
38.    Ask how the food is prepared when ordering in a restaurant.
39.    Choose low-fat frozen yogurt or frozen juice bars instead of ice cream. Be careful of the portion size – these foods still have calories!
40.    Select clear broth- or tomato-based soups over white soups.
41.    Keep the junk foods out of sight in your home and workplace.
42.    Take walking shoes or a jump rope with you when you travel to keep up with your exercise.
43.    If you’re getting off track, try to pre-plan your food intake for the next three days by writing it down.
44.    Buy frozen diet dinners with 10 grams of fat or less and 800 milligrams of sodium or less.
45.    Avoid batter coating or breading.
46.    Use two egg whites in baking instead of one whole egg.
47.    Stretch during television commercials—arm circles, leg lifts, head tilts, etc.
48.    Eliminate the butter on your rolls or popcorn.
49.    Learn to say “no” gracefully when a friend or relative offers you a second helping.
50.    Choose pizza with vegetable toppings rather than high-fat meats, such as sausage and pepperoni.
51.    Ask for less cheese. Have you ever tried tomato pie?
52.    Choose cooking techniques that keep fat to a minimum, such as baking, grilling, broiling, roasting or steaming.
53.    Add more low-fat soy products to your diet for the soy protein and health benefits.
54.    Forgive yourself when you slip—and make the next food choice a healthy one.

Surprising Statistics About BMI – (Body Mass Index)

 

To say that Americans are obsessed with dieting is an
understatement! Pick up any magazine, tune-in or turn-on any
source of advertising and you’re bombarded with the latest diet
schemes and food fads. More often than not, they are endorsed by
some familiar Hollywood celebrity, or promoted using some other
cleaver technique.

It’s no mystery that the weight-loss industry has built a
thriving empire. In America, for example, we spend about 35
billion dollars every year on an assortment of weight loss
products and plans. In addition, we spend another 79 billion
dollars for medication, hospitalization, and doctors to treat
obesity-related problems. Even with this, the obesity epidemic
continues to spread. Sadly, we have become the heaviest
generation in our Nation’s history.

The National Center for Health Statistics reports that we have
some very good reasons to be concerned about our weight-gain.
Americans, for example are packing-on the pounds faster than ever
before and weight-related medical problems are taking center
stage. Diseases like heart disease, diabetes and yes…even
certain forms of cancer have all been linked to obesity.

Here are a few of the surprising statistics about our weight:

  • A whopping 64 percent of U.S. adults are either overweight or
    obese. That’s up approximately 8 percent from overweight
    estimates obtained in a 1988 report.

  • The percent of children who are overweight is also continuing
    to increase. Among children and teens ages 6-19, 15 percent or
    almost 9 million are overweight. That’s triple what the rate was
    in 1980!

  • Nearly one-third of all adults are now classified as obese. At
    present, 31 percent of adults 20 years of age and over or nearly
    59 million people have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater,
    compared with 23 percent in 1994.

(The BMI is a number that shows body weight adjusted for height.
For adults, a BMI of 18.5 – 24.9 is considered normal. A BMI of
25.0 – 29.9 is overweight and 30.0 or above, is considered
obese.)

Modern life both at home and at work has come to revolve around
moving from one “seated” position to another: whether it’s
television, computers, remote controls, or automobiles, we seem
to be broadening the scope of our inactive endeavors.

At times, life seems to have gotten almost too easy! For
entertainment, we can now just sit-down, dial-up our favorite TV
program or DVD movie and enjoy hours of uninterrupted
entertainment…

And all those simple calorie burning activities that were once a
normal part of our daily routine not so long ago? Long gone! You
know the ones I’m talking about…activities like climbing stairs
instead of using escalators and elevators. Or, pushing a lawn
mower instead of riding around on a garden tractor. And what
about that daily walk to school? Now, our kids complain when the
school bus happens to be a few minutes late getting to the bus
stop!

Along with the convenience of our affluent lifestyle and
reduction in energy expenditure, have come changes in our diet.
We are now consuming more calorie rich and nutrient deficient
foods than ever before.

Here are a few examples of what we were eating in the 1970’s
compared to our diet today (information is taken from a recent
U.S. Department of Agriculture survey):

  • We are currently eating more grain products, but almost all of
    them are refined grains (white bread, etc.). Grain consumption
    has jumped 45 percent since the 1970s, from 138 pounds of grains
    per person per year to 200 pounds! Only 2 percent of the wheat
    flour is consumed as whole wheat.

  • Our consumption of fruits and vegetables has increased, but
    only because the U.S.D.A. includes French fries and potato chips
    as a vegetable. Potato products account for almost a third of our
    “produce” choices.

  • We’re drinking less milk, but we’ve more than doubled our
    cheese intake. Cheese now outranks meat as the number one source
    of saturated fat in our diets.

  • We’ve cut back on red meat, but have more than made up for the
    loss by increasing our intake of chicken (battered and fried), so
    that overall, we’re eating 13 pounds more meat today than we did
    back in the 1970s.

  • We’re drinking three times more carbonated soft drinks than
    milk, compared to the 1970’s, when milk consumption was twice
    that of pop.

  • We use 25 percent less butter, but pour twice as much vegetable
    oil on our food and salads, so our total added fat intake has
    increased 32 percent.

  • Sugar consumption has been another cause of our expanding
    waistlines. Sugar intake is simply off the charts. According to
    the U.S. Department of Agriculture, people are consuming roughly
    twice the amount of sugar they need each day, about 20 teaspoons
    on a 2000 calorie/day diet. The added sugar is found mostly in
    junk foods, such as pop, cake, and cookies.

  • In 1978, the government found that sugars constituted only 11
    percent of the average person’s calories. Now, this number has
    ballooned to 16 percent for the average American adult and as
    much as 20 percent for American teenagers.

The days of the wholesome family dinners so near and dear to our
hearts, where we all sat around the kitchen table to discuss
events of the day, are now a part of our sentimental past. They
have been replaced by our cravings for take-out and fast-food. We
have gradually come to accept that it’s “OK” to sacrifice healthy
foods for the sake of convenience and that larger serving
portions mean better value.

And, since I have been throwing-out statistics, here’s one more:
Americans are consuming about 300 more calories each day than we
did twenty years ago. We should actually be eating less because
of our decreased activity level, but instead are doing the
opposite!

Decide TODAY that healthy eating and exercise habits will become
a permanent part of your life!

Begin to explore your values and thoughts and other areas of your
life where change may be required, and then take action. Begin
slowly, but deliberately to make improvements in the areas you
identify. And remember, it has taken a very long time to develop
your habits, and it will take some time to undo them…so be
patient!

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes
only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any
disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any
health care program.

About the Author

Emily Clark is editor at Lifestyle Health News and Medical Health News
where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on
many medical, health and lifestyle topics.