Gastritis in Dogs — What to Know


The post Gastritis in Dogs — What to Know by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

If your dog suddenly begins throwing up, he may have a condition called gastritis. Gastritis develops when a dog’s stomach lining becomes inflamed and usually results from a dog consuming something that either they shouldn’t have because it is toxic or not digestible. However, this irritation and inflammation of the stomach lining can also be caused by a stomach irritation unrelated to what the dog has eaten.

Symptoms of Gastritis:

Embrace Pet Insurance Claims Manager Rachel Hinder RVT explains that the most common symptom of a dog with gastritis is vomiting. This vomiting might take the form of bile, vomiting up food. She continues that dogs with gastritis might also include vomiting blood, foreign objects or water.

A sick dog lying on the floor looking sad.

A sick dog lying on the floor looking sad. Photography ©Lightguard | E+ / Getty Images.

Dr. Rebello Emergency Medical Director with NorthStar VETS (https://www.northstarvets.com/home) also advises dog guardians to watch for poor appetite as a symptom of gastritis, and Hinder notes that “if gastritis persists, dogs can exhibit weight loss” as well as lethargy.

Causes of Gastritis

Dr. Rebello explains that gastritis can be caused by infection (bacterial, viral or parasitic infections), simple dietary indiscretion, toxin exposure, inflammatory bowel disease, etc.”

Diagnosis of Gastritis:

To diagnose a dog with gastritis, Rachel says vets will primarily look at a dog’s history as well as clinical signs (such as vomiting). She explains that additional diagnostic tests may be needed in order to determine what the underlying cause of the dog’s gastritis might be and if any foreign objects have been ingested. These tests may include radiographs, bloodwork, ultrasound and even exploratory surgery.

Treatment of Gastritis:

Once your dog’s vet has determined the cause of gastritis, Rachel explains that gastritis is “often treated symptomatically” This will likely take the form of antiemetic medication (for vominting and nausea), supportive fluids, gastric protectant medications and/or nutritional support.

Sick dog

Sick dog. Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images

She notes that if the cause of a dog’s gastritis is ingested foreign material that has resulted in an obstruction, treatment for your dog may require surgery. In addition, “If the pet ingested something toxic, they may need extra supportive care to help the dog pass the toxin.” Essentially the treatment is going to primarily be dictated by what the underlying cause of the gastritis is.

Prognosis of Gastritis:

If your dog has gastritis, Dr. Rebello says the “prognosis is generally very good with treatment with anti-nausea medication, antacids and fluids.” But Rachel adds that a dog’s prognosis will depend on the underlying cause of the gastritis. She says mild cases can be treated symptomatically with most dogs making full recoveries, however she did caution that if a dog has a more serious underlying cause for gastritis the prognosis may be less certain.

Ways to Avoid Gastritis:

The best way to avoid gastritis is to be very cautious about what your dog eats. Rachel advises that all dog guardians should limit what their dogs have access to, especially in terms of any toxins, foreign materials or items in the yard that your dog is likely to chew or possibly invest. In addition, she says to limit and research the kinds of food and treats that you give your dog. If you need to switch your dog’s food to a new type of food, do so gradually, and if you have any concerns seek support from your vet, as a sudden food change could also bring on gastritis symptoms in some dogs.

When To Go To The Vet:

A side effect of excessive vomiting can be dehydration, which can set in quickly and can cause additional complications, especially for very small dogs and puppies. The risk of dehydration is one reason Rachel advises that dogs who are vomiting and suspected of having gastritis should be seen by their veterinarian right away. Your vet will be able to make a diagnosis, explore the underlying cause and begin appropriate treatment.

About the author:

Sassafras Lowrey is an award-winning author and Certified Trick Dog Instructor. Sassafras’ books have been honored by organizations ranging from the American Library Association to the Lambda Literary Foundation. New dog books from Sassafras in 2019 include: Healing/Heeling, Bedtime Stories for Rescue Dogs: William To The Rescue (with Lili Chin), and TRICKS IN THE CITY: For Daring Dogs and the Humans That Love Them (forthcoming in August from Mango Press). Learn more at www.SassafrasLowrey.com.

Learn more about health issues in dogs on dogster.com:

The post Gastritis in Dogs — What to Know by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.



Source link

TopSecretFatLossSecret

Product Name: TopSecretFatLossSecret

Click here to get TopSecretFatLossSecret at discounted price while it’s still available…

All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors.

TopSecretFatLossSecret is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60 days of receipt you are not satisfied with Wake Up Lean™, you can request a refund by sending an email to the address given inside the product and we will immediately refund your entire purchase price, with no questions asked.

Continue reading “TopSecretFatLossSecret”

What to Know About a 6-Year-Old Dog


The post What to Know About a 6-Year-Old Dog by Audrey Pavia appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

When my Australian Cattle Dog mix, Candy, first came to live with me, she was 6 years old. I’d adopted her from a local animal shelter where, three weeks prior, her family had surrendered
her because they were moving.

Six years of age is a tough time for a dog to have to make a huge life change. By the age of 6, most dogs have reached middle age. For some larger dogs, 6 is the beginning of the senior years. Dogs this age are set in their ways and have developed a strong bond with their family. Candy was no exception. After we brought her home, she spent several months in a depressed state, sleeping in a corner of the yard, far away from the goings-on of the household.

Keeping your dog active is one of the best ways to keep him healthy.  Photography by: ©alexei_tm | Getty Images

Keeping your dog active is one of the best ways to keep him healthy. Photography by: ©alexei_tm | Getty Images

It’s not surprising that it took Candy about six months to adjust to her new life. At the age of 6, she was well into her adulthood. Her daily routine and the people she lived with since puppyhood had provided her with the safety and security she needed. Having all that torn away from her halfway through her life was traumatic.

But 6-year-old dogs are not old — they are simply mature. With a little bit of patience and love, Candy adjusted to her new life and became a happy girl. Still young enough to play, hike, go to the beach and attend training classes, she was also a great surrogate mom to our new puppy.

Managing middle age

What can you do to make sure your dog stays happy and healthy during this stage of her life? Plenty! Six is a great age, and you can do a lot with your dog.

Fun outings. Take her on walks, hikes, camping trips — any place you can go that allows dogs. The more exercise and activity you can provide your dog at this age, the longer she will stay healthy and alert.

More training. Six-year-old dogs might be middle-aged, but they’re still capable of learning — a lot. If your dog doesn’t have basic obedience training, take her to a class. It will not only make her a better companion, it will also provide her with mental stimulation. If your dog is already a champ when it comes to the basics, think about taking up a fun dog sport, like agility or rally. At 6 years old, your dog has a better attention span than she did as a puppy and will catch on quickly.

Playtime. Does your dog still like to play? By the age of 6, many dogs still love to chase balls, gnaw on bully sticks and chomp on squeaky toys. Many still also enjoy playing with other dogs. Take your dog on a shopping trip to a local pet supply store and let her pick out some new toys. If she enjoys romping with other dogs, make playdates with your friends’ dogs, or enroll her in doggie day care. Here she can spend an entire day playing with carefully screened dogs, all while under supervision. Even just one day a week at doggie day care can bring lots of fun and stimulation into your dog’s life.

Comfy bed. Now that your dog has hit middle age, add some items to help her stay happy and comfortable. An orthopedic bed is a good start. Designed to make it easier on your dog’s joints, orthopedic beds provide more cushion than a standard bed. While your dog may not yet be arthritic, an orthopedic bed can help keep her comfortable as her joints age.

Nutritional supplements. Your middle-aged dog might benefit from some dietary supplements at this point in her life. Omega-3 oils for dogs can help her coat stay healthy, while a joint supplement containing glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM can help her joints stay healthy longer.

Regular exams. If you haven’t been doing it already, start taking your 6-year-old dog for annual health checks. Yearly blood work and a veterinary exam can help you get a jump on any possible health issues that may be developing. As dogs age, they are more prone to kidney disease, joint problems and other maladies.

Being a pet parent to a 6-year-old dog can be a real joy. Well past the puppy years but still young enough to play and learn, middle-aged dogs make excellent companions.

About the author:

An award-winning writer and editor, Audrey Pavia is a former managing editor at Dog Fancy magazine and former senior editor of The AKC Gazette. She is the author of The Labrador Retriever Handbook (Barrons) and has written extensively on horses as well as other pets. She shares her home in Norco, California, with two rescue dogs, Candy and Mookie.

Learn more tips for caring for your dog on dogster.com:

The post What to Know About a 6-Year-Old Dog by Audrey Pavia appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.



Source link