Custom Cookie Cutters


The post Custom Cookie Cutters by Melissa L. Kauffman appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Ivan Gersonskiy came up with this brilliant idea. “I make a custom design based on the photo of a dog,
cat or any other pet (like lemur, parrot, squirrel, etc.) and then we 3D print it,” Ivan explains. “All cutters are made of food-safe, biodegradable plastic.”

Just send a photo of your dog (or any other pet) and it will become a cookie cutter — and a wagalicious gift for you or any pet lover. “The first pet portrait cutter I made was a cookie cutter of my own dog,” Ivan says. “It turned out really great, and it was such fun to make these cookies.”

One of Ivan’s recent orders was a portrait of a dog for his 20th birthday. “They are making a family celebration,” says Ivan, “and I’m happy to participate just a little bit in such an amazing event. Each pet portrait I make is special to me; I’m trying to catch the personal features and character of each. I really enjoy my work. What can be more positive than happy cat or dog faces?” Cookie cutters retail for $27. See Bakers Street Cutters at etsy.com/shop/bakersstreetcutters.       

About the author:

Covering the pet world for more than 25 years, Melissa L. Kauffman has been an editor/writer for a wide variety of pet magazines and websites from the small critters to parrots to cats and dogs. Her advisory team of rescued pets — dogs Tampa Bay and Justice and parrots Deacon and Pi-Pi — help keep her on top of the latest and greatest pet health research, training and products, anything to give keep them in the high life they are accustomed to. Follow Tampa and his crew on Instagram @tampa.bay.pup.report while Melissa can always be found working on the next issue of Catster and Dogster magazines at caster.com and dogster.com.

The post Custom Cookie Cutters by Melissa L. Kauffman appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.



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Service Dogs Good for Recipients and Their Families


The post Service Dogs Good for Recipients and Their Families by Jackie Brown appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

A Purdue University study published in May in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy attached a numerical measure to the positive effect of service dogs on humans. Although previous studies demonstrated that service dogs improve people’s quality of life, this study is the first to show measurable benefits of service dogs. According to the study, living with a service dog was most closely associated with less health-related worry, and better overall psychosocial health and emotional functioning, less total family impact from the chronic condition and better emotional health-related quality of life.

Thumbnail: Photography ©Sinenkiy | Getty Images

About the author:

Jackie Brown is a freelance writer from Southern California who specializes in the pet industry. Reach her at jackiebrown writer.wordpress.com.

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The post Service Dogs Good for Recipients and Their Families by Jackie Brown appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.



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Why We Love Black Dogs


The post Why We Love Black Dogs by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Here are our favorite things to love about black dogs:

1 Always ready to go

While you should always keep your dog clean and well-groomed, with a black dog that last-minute roll in the mud right before dinner guests arrive might be a little less noticeable! Compared to dogs with light fur, dirt shows up much less on black dogs — which can be convenient.

Photography ©damedeeso | Getty Images

2 Improve your photography

Want a new hobby? Black dogs might be very photogenic, but they can also be harder to photograph, especially inside or in low-lighting situations. Like any other dog guardian, you are going to want to take lots of pictures of your dog, so you’ll end up becoming an amateur photographer to get that perfect shot.

3 Look good in everything

Who doesn’t love to spoil their dog? Fancy dog collars, bandannas and even costumes all look fantastic on black dogs. You can go with any color accessory and it will stand out beautifully against your dog’s coat. Don’t forget bejeweled leashes and designer dog beds. Your black dog will coordinate with any doggie décor or accessory!

Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images

4 Match your tux/gown

Do you like to dress up? Having a black dog means your pup will always coordinate with your favorite little black dress. Not into dressing up but wear a lot of black? Having a black dog means that your dog’s fur is way less likely to show up on you. Basically, black dogs make anyone look more pulled together.

5 Hide-and-Seek

Your black dog will be the perfect hide-and-seek partner because of how easily he can blend into dark corners of your house. As a fun trick, teach your black dog to hide in closets or corners, but don’t forget to teach your dog to
come, or you might be searching for a while!

6 They might be magical

In Europe and especially England, there are many examples in folklore about apparitions of black dogs. Although sometimes this mythology portrays these big, black dogs as haunting “hellhounds,” the ancient Egyptians worshiped the god Anubis who was associated with the afterlife. Anubis is depicted as a black dog-like figure. God or hound of hell — either way you have a brilliant built-in Halloween costume!

7 Introvert bestie

Don’t like talking to people? Get a black dog! People have a lot of preconceived misconceptions that black dogs are mean or unapproachable, so having a black dog might mean people leave you alone, which means more uninterrupted time hanging out with your dog! (Although you should always be a black dog ambassador and help dispel people of that myth!)

8 Hidden speed bump

Black dogs are likely to make you go bump in the night! It seems like all dogs like to sleep right where your feet need to be, and black dogs are almost invisible, especially in the middle of the night when you’re heading to the kitchen for a drink of water or a snack. The good thing is if there were ever a burglar, your black dog would also trip them — and then probably lick them to death.

Sassafras Lowrey is an award-winning author. Her novels have been honored by organizations ranging from the Lambda Literary Foundation to the American Library Association. Sassafras is a Certified Trick Dog Instructor, and assists with dog agility classes. Sassafras lives and writes in Brooklyn with her partner, a senior Chihuahua mix, a rescued Shepherd mix and a Newfoundland puppy, along with two bossy cats and a semi-feral kitten. Learn more at sassafraslowrey.com

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When Your Dog is 12 Years Old


The post When Your Dog is 12 Years Old by Audrey Pavia appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

For humans, a big difference can exist between someone who is 64 years old and 77 years old. The 64-year-old is more likely to be active and may only be feeling a few aches and pains of old age. The 77-year-old, on the other hand, may be slowing down a bit, depending on his overall health.

The same is true for dogs in this comparative age group. If you have a smaller dog that has reached the age of 12, you probably won’t notice as many age-related changes than you would if your dog weighs more than 50 pounds.

Whatever your dog’s size, you may start to see some evidence that he is eligible for his AARP membership card. Here’s how being alive for 12 years affects different sized dogs:

Dog and birthday cake

Photography ©MarcusPhoto1 | Getty Images

Small dogs

Dogs weighing less than 20 pounds tend to live longer than larger dogs and aren’t showing as much signs of old age by the time they hit 12 years. While it’s unlikely your small dog will have the same energy he did as a puppy or young adult, he should still be capable of playing, going on long walks and jumping up out of his bed at dinnertime. Keeping him at a healthy weight is crucial, especially at his age. If he’s carrying too many pounds, the excess weight will slow him down and make him more prone to developing arthritis in the next few years.

Small dogs are notorious for dental issues, and if your dog hasn’t had regular dental care over the course of his life, you may start to see problems by the time he is 12. Periodontal disease, loose and infected teeth and bad breath can all be problems that turn up in small dogs of this age.

Medium dogs

Because dogs in this weight category are pushing 70 in human years, they will start to show some signs of aging. Your dog’s energy level will probably not be what it once was. He will still enjoy walks and outings, but he likely won’t have the stamina to go all day without a few long breaks. Do still provide your dog with regular exercise, even if he isn’t as eager to run around as he used to be. Activity will keep his muscles well-toned, his weight down and his joints healthy.

Another way to help your dog’s joints is to start him on a nutritional joint supplement. Commercial supplements containing glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM are reported to be helpful in minimizing the effects of arthritis in dogs. You may also want to get your dog an orthopedic bed to sleep on, as this can help ease any discomfort he might be feeling in his joints.

A visit to the veterinarian every 6 months is a good idea for a medium- sized dog who has reached the age of 12. The vet will draw blood and do a physical exam, both of which can help detect problems at the early stage. Since dogs in this age group are more prone to developing serious health issues like kidney failure or diabetes, the sooner these problems are detected, the better the outlook for treatment.

Large dogs

A 12-year-old dog in the over-50-pounds weight class is well into his senior years. It’s likely your large dog has slowed down quite a bit and prefers long naps to running in the yard. He may also be losing his hearing and/or his sight, and he may be suffering from arthritis.

Even though your large dog may be experiencing these physical challenges, it doesn’t mean he’s ready to give up. Older dogs can still have happy, fulfilling lives with just a few adjustments on your part.

First, see a veterinarian at least twice a year for checkups. Your vet can help alleviate some of the discomfort he might feel due to arthritis or other age-related issues. If your dog is starting to lose his sight, help him by keeping your furniture in the same place all the time — don’t rearrange the house on a whim! Avoid putting him in unfamiliar situations unless you have him on a leash and can carefully guide him. If your 12-year-old dog is losing his hearing, start teaching him sign language so you can continue to communicate with him. Use hand signals for “come,” “sit” and “stay,” for starters. You’ll be amazed at how quickly your dog will catch on.

Although older dogs are not as active as they were in their youth, it’s still important to give them regular exercise. Take your dog for walks around the neighborhood or at a local park. The movement will help keep his joints lubricated and will provide him with the kind of mental stimulation he needs to stay young.

Thumbnail: Photography ©K_Thalhofer | Getty Images

About the author:

An award-winning writer and editor, Audrey Pavia is a former managing editor at Dog Fancy magazine and former senior editor of The AKC Gazette. She is the author of The Labrador Retriever Handbook (Barrons) and has written extensively on horses as well as other pets. She shares her home in Norco, California, with two rescue dogs, Candy and Mookie.

Learn more tips for caring for your dog on dogster.com:

The post When Your Dog is 12 Years Old by Audrey Pavia appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.



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