Category: Eating Desorder

Confessions of  a Personal Fitness Trainer

As your personal fitness trainer my passion is to teach, coach, understand, push, prod, cajole, investigate,research and apply, over and over…

As a ‘Fitness Role Model’…well…I feel vulnerable with weakness, so, in hopes we can all learn, from my own weakness,here goes…My Confession.

Last year I had a number of clients who started stubbornly on the Atkins diet despite my warnings. Immediately I saw almost profound results in their weight loss. I reminded them it was the loss of water weight, and warned of the strain on the kidneys and the high cholesterol risk.During this time I was mastering my yoga practice as a complete vegan but found that my immune system had been profoundly compromised and I was currently on my third cold for the fall season Atkins was in the media again because of new study results indicating lowered cholesterol. I went to the Atkins book yet again with a more open mind, and decided to try the diet. I liked the contrarian view point to the current AMA position of the low fat diet, which seemed to be producing a society of increasing obesity. Atkins view of sugar as the culprit making you fat, not fat, made sense and the extra work from all the protein for the kidneys… it’s benign. I wanted to use his diet as a tool to get myself entirely off of any sugar.
I started out on the high protein, low carb aspect of the diet. As I reintroduced the animal proteins into my diet I could feel myself get stronger and the colds, finally stopped. I also saw my muscle bellies start to open and swell again. The cold of winter was not as painful as it had been while on my vegan diet.
I then summoned up the courage to start bringing fats into my diet, including bacon, egg yolks, cream cheese, heavy cream, whipped cream, even bacon rinds. On a daily basis I would marvel at having eaten these “forbidden foods” only to awaken the next day thin, svelte. I couldn’t believe this, result! I was loving eating all these foods so familiar yet banished since …childhood I was in full swing eating the high fat, high protein, low carb diet at the time when the pictures on my website were taken. www.vitalsignsfitness.com I felt strong, but I had no energy!!! My walks on the beach were lethargic, I had to force myself to go that extra mile. I was thin but I felt like a beached whale. My love affair with Atkins continued a few more months. I followed his prescriptions religiously. Eventually I had to add more carbs, I needed more energy. By carbs I mean vegetables, salads and whole grains. At this point I gained back the total of two pounds I had lost on Atkins. Body fat went from 16% to 18%, my energy was better. After 7 months I decided it was time to get the blood checked out and to my horror discovered that my cholesterol which had always been around 150 had rocketed up to 300!! Luckily my HDL to LDL ratio was still at a healthy level. Thanks to my forcing myself to exercise, I kept my HDLs high.
I immediately started drinking hot lemon juice with cayenne pepper every morning to clean my blood. I have now thrown away all the high fat foods and have once again, come back full circle to moderation and balance. A balanced diet. It takes a little more discipline but my energy is back and I can now eat the same meals as my husband so dinner preparation is simpler. My weight has not changed since I gradually introduced the carbs. I avoid at all costs the “white foods” flour, sugar, milk. I drink unsweetened soy milk I avoid foods in packages, boxes and bags. I feel a fine layer of fat but that’s okay its winter, I need it, and in the summer, heat always melts it off. I am completely off sugar and alcohol to keep blood sugar low.

Log into www.vitalsignsfitness in the Chat page where a discussion has already begun re: Atkins and other dietplans, add your comments or just read and muse. Or go to the Nutrition Program page and find out how many calories (protein, carbs, fats) you should eat to sustain your current or ideal weight.

Deborah Caruana RN, AAHRFP, NASM, ACE,
www.vitalsignsfitness.com
email

deb@vitalsignsfitness.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

DEBORAH is a highly respected authority in personal training for overall health and fitness, with more than 22 years of experience and success.



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Eating Disorders, Anorexia and Bulimia

This article is freely available for reprint provided that the
resource box at the end of the article is left intact and the
article is published complete.

Eating Disorders: Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia

The incidences of eating disorders in our society have been steadily increasing over the last few years. It now occurs in 1 out of every 100 women. Nineteen out of 20 people who suffer from eating disorders are young women between 18 and 25.

Studies have found that our social habits and expectations increase the likelihood of the disorder in our young women. The emphasis on outward appearances and thinness are targeted daily through peer pressure and how our society markets its Health and Fitness Products and Services.

Yes obesity is definitely a problem in our society, and we have guidelines for Health and Nutrition, but the majority of young women fail to follow the guidelines in an effort to gain immediate gratification or have had abnormal eating habits throughout their lifetime.

Anorexia Nervosa:

Case Study:

Jennifer is 20 years old. She is very attractive and has always been an over achiever. From an early age she prided herself on her figure. She watched her diet, exercised daily and maintained a regiment of self-discipline. She has always been thin, but has never been satisfied with her weight or appearance. She continually strives to lose more weight. She is 5’ 6” and weighs 85 lbs.

Jennifer is unaware of the fact that she is undernourished, therefore she sees no problem with her appearance or weight.

How does this happen??

Learned behavior has a great deal to do with why this happens. Many young women develop anorexia-like patterns as our society is pressured with the pursuit of thinness. Many women are anorexic based on the eating patterns they have developed by trying to accomplish unrealistic weight goals.

Fashion models, long distance runners, women athletes and dancers commonly have anorexia-like traits.

  1. An intense fear of becoming obese. Even as they lose more weight.
  2. Inaccurate vision of how their bodies appear. Feeling fat when in actuality they are very thin and emaciated.
  3. Continual weight loss. 25% or more of their original body weight.
  4. Refusal to gain weight, which would place them in a normal body weight range.

Physical Dangers:

A rigorous dieting regime will send the body into starvation mode. Then the physical effects will start to manifest themselves:

Thyroid hormones will become abnormal. Adrenal, growth hormones and blood-pressure hormones also become abnormal.

Heart functions change. The heart pumps less efficiently, muscles become weak and thin. Heart rhythms many change. Blood pressure levels fall.

GI function can become abnormal. Diarrhea occurs as the lining of the digestive tract slow.

High levels of Vitamin A and Carotene in the blood.

Reduced levels of Protein.

An increase in fine body hair, skin dryness and deceased skin temperatures.

Brain activity becomes abnormal. Loss of sleep and feeling of never having enough rest.

Anorexia Nervosa is hard to diagnose, because almost everyone in our society is in pursuing thinness. Denial and deception are common place for young women with Anorexia, therefore it takes a skilled professional to diagnose Anorexia.

Bulimia

Bulimia occurs in women of all ages, but is more common among those under 30. Bulimia is more common than Anorexia and in males. Only a small percentage of people who are Bulimic show signs of Anorexia.

Case Study:

Carry is a women in her late twenties, she maintain a normal weight range and obsesses about food. She starves herself then binges, when she has eaten too much she vomits.

Carry, like 60% of people with Bulimia, starts to binge after a period of extreme dieting. The most popular binge foods are food that are high in sugar and fat, and are easy to eat in large amounts. (cookies, cakes, ice cream, and bread products)

The side effects of the binge eating are swollen hands and feet, bloating, fatigue, headaches, nausea and pain.

Physical Dangers:

Fluid and Electrolyte imbalances.

Abnormal Heart rhythms

Kidney dysfunction which can cause bladder infections and kidney failure.

Irritation to the pharynx, esophagus, and salivary glands.

Erosion of teeth and dental caries.

Use of laxatives can cause injury to the intestinal tract.

Bulimia has been described as a socially approved method of weight control. Practiced among women in the upper-classes because of social obligations which include many dinners and parties.

Both Anorexia and Bulimia are socially generated eating disorders generated by our need for the “perfect image”, resulting in self-destructive eating patterns.

Listen to your Body, it is Wiser than you Think. Respect your own unique traits and Diet sensibly.

Resources:

WebMD
http://my.webmd.com

Eating Disorder Treatment and Helpline
http://edhelpline.com

National Eating Disorders Association
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

Anorexia and Bulimia Care
http://www.anorexiabulimiacare.co.uk

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Written by Tina M. Rideout, For more information about Health and Fitness visit:
http://clean-living-nutritional-supplements.com