How to Create an Invoicing Process That Fits Your Business

Invoicing. Seems pretty straightforward, right?

You send a customer an invoice. They pay it. You’re rich. Yay. 

Unfortunately, that’s not always how the story goes. And in most organizations, disorganized invoicing can be a serious time suck. 

Like most things worth doing, creating an invoicing process isn’t the easiest task to accomplish. It requires some strategic thought, a handful of decisions that could impact your business long-term, and a bit of alignment.Use the free HubSpot Invoice Template Generator to create professional  invoices in minutes.To help you get started, we’ve outlined the basics for setting up an organized invoicing process for your business below.

Invoicing Payment Terms

As an SMB, you’ve got you own set of expenses to cover, which means it’s super important that you have a clear plan for bringing money back in to your business.

To do this effectively, you need to start by looking inward and defining the payment terms that make the most sense for your business.

To create clear payment terms, you need to figure out:

1) When you want to get paid.

Depending on the product or service you offer, as well as your own unique business needs, you can choose to invoice weekly, monthly, quarterly, or set a custom schedule.

The key word here is schedule: You want to pick a payment plan and stick to it to avoid confusion, set clear expectations, and streamline cash flow.

2) How you want to get paid.

Payment methods refer to the channels through which your customers can pay for your products or services.

Your approved payment methods play an important role in facilitating hassle-free invoicing and should aim to reflect your unique business needs and privacy commitments.

These methods should also reflect your customer’s payment preferences. By meeting your customers where they are, you make it easier for them to complete payments on time, every time.

Different payment methods might include: Credit/debit card payments, cash, check, money order, and so on.

3) Debt collection policies.

Even when you have an organized process for invoicing, having to deal with non-paying customers is still a reality to plan for.

When defining your payment terms, consider including the actionable steps you will take if you are unable to resolve an unpaid invoice.

For example, you may state that you will contact the customer three times before involving a lawyer or business advisor to pursue further action. This will helps to make it clear that payment is mandatory and you have a plan for follow up.

Invoice Creation

Once you know your non-negotiables, you’re ready to create an invoice.

Depending on whether or provide a service or a product, the following guidelines serve as best practices when creating a professional invoice:

  • Include the word “Invoice.”
  • Assign a unique invoice number and date.
  • Provide your business name and contact information.
  • List out the details of the product(s) or service(s) you provided — include quantity, rates, hours, etc.
  • Provide the name and contact information of the customer.
  • Highlight the subtotal.
  • Specify any payment details or a due date if necessary. 

Sounds like a lot to remember? There are a number of free invoicing tools that you can lean on to ensure you’re not leaving any important information off of your invoices.

For example, our free Invoice Template Generator aims to simplify the process by allowing you to easily create and download professional invoices to send to your customers.

HubSpot Invoice Generator.png

Simply fill in your business details in the invoice template to populate the statement, customize the color and logo to fit your brand, and download it as a PDF to be sent off to your customers.

Invoice QA

“Proof your invoice for typos, currency errors and computational mistakes. In many cases, invoices are sent to collections because the client won’t pay due to an invoicing error,” explains finance and accounting professional, Simon Speirs. 

To avoid sending off an invoice to customer containing any silly mistakes, take the time to review each invoice to ensure:

  • You’re sending it to the right contact. Invoices contain sensitive financial information. Make sure you’re routing it to the right place to avoid any legal issues.
  • You’ve got your numbers straight. Double-check itemized lines for proper quantities, hours, and prices. Revisit totals and subtotals, paying close attention to the accuracy of tax and discounts.
  • You’ve specified any additional payment details. There should be no surprise fees included on your final invoice. If you’ve added anything that hasn’t already been discussed with the customer, be sure to specify why it’s included.
  • You’re using the right currency. If you’re billing international customers, be sure that all of the currency conversions add up.
  • You’ve included your contact information. In the even that customer does have questions about the invoice, include your contact information and logo to point them in the right direction to get assistance.

Delivering & Monitoring Invoices

There are a few different ways you can actually send off your invoice to your customer. Two of the most common options?

  1. Send the invoice electronically via email or website.
  2. Send the invoice via postal mail.

Sending an invoice electronically means that you have the option to send it through email or directly from your accounting or invoicing software.

This is typically a preferred delivery method, as it allows you to send invoices quickly, as projects or orders are completed.

If you choose to send an invoice by postal mail, you’ll want to pay close attention to timing, as it may take a few days for your invoice to arrive, be processed, and then be sent back.

What happens if I don’t get paid?

Remember those payment terms you set up at the start of all of this? It’s time to review ‘em. This will help you determine whether or not the customer has violated the terms entirely, or if they are just cutting it close.

Before you do anything, reach out to the customer to provide a friendly payment reminder – this is a best practice. You can do this via email, phone, or mail – just be sure that you’re both prompt and clear in your outreach. You may find it’s best to send several follow up attempts.

If you fail to secure payment or renegotiate payment terms after following up with a customer, you’ll want to consult a trusted business advisor or lawyer to discuss next steps for pursuing the outstanding invoice.

Ready to Start Getting Paid?

Effective invoicing doesn’t happen overnight — so be patient. The important thing is that you recognize the importance of implementing an organized, agreed-upon process for keeping up with the outgoing and incoming, and you commit to making regular improvements to it. 

Disclaimer: This blog post includes some information on legal issues surrounding invoicing, but legal information is not the same as legal advice — applying the law to a specific circumstance. We’ve conducted research to better ensure that our information is accurate and useful, but we insist that you talk to a lawyer if you want professional assurance that our information, and your interpretation of it, is accurate. In a nutshell, you may not rely on this information as legal advice, nor as a recommendation or endorsement of any particular legal understanding, and you should instead see this info as for entertainment purposes only.

Invoice Template

 
Invoice Template

Invoicing. Seems pretty straightforward, right?

You send a customer an invoice. They pay it. You’re rich. Yay. 

Unfortunately, that’s not always how the story goes. And in most organizations, disorganized invoicing can be a serious time suck. 

Like most things worth doing, creating an invoicing process isn’t the easiest task to accomplish. It requires some strategic thought, a handful of decisions that could impact your business long-term, and a bit of alignment.Use the free HubSpot Invoice Template Generator to create professional  invoices in minutes.To help you get started, we’ve outlined the basics for setting up an organized invoicing process for your business below.

Invoicing Payment Terms

As an SMB, you’ve got you own set of expenses to cover, which means it’s super important that you have a clear plan for bringing money back in to your business.

To do this effectively, you need to start by looking inward and defining the payment terms that make the most sense for your business.

To create clear payment terms, you need to figure out:

1) When you want to get paid.

Depending on the product or service you offer, as well as your own unique business needs, you can choose to invoice weekly, monthly, quarterly, or set a custom schedule.

The key word here is schedule: You want to pick a payment plan and stick to it to avoid confusion, set clear expectations, and streamline cash flow.

2) How you want to get paid.

Payment methods refer to the channels through which your customers can pay for your products or services.

Your approved payment methods play an important role in facilitating hassle-free invoicing and should aim to reflect your unique business needs and privacy commitments.

These methods should also reflect your customer’s payment preferences. By meeting your customers where they are, you make it easier for them to complete payments on time, every time.

Different payment methods might include: Credit/debit card payments, cash, check, money order, and so on.

3) Debt collection policies.

Even when you have an organized process for invoicing, having to deal with non-paying customers is still a reality to plan for.

When defining your payment terms, consider including the actionable steps you will take if you are unable to resolve an unpaid invoice.

For example, you may state that you will contact the customer three times before involving a lawyer or business advisor to pursue further action. This will helps to make it clear that payment is mandatory and you have a plan for follow up.

Invoice Creation

Once you know your non-negotiables, you’re ready to create an invoice.

Depending on whether or provide a service or a product, the following guidelines serve as best practices when creating a professional invoice:

  • Include the word “Invoice.”
  • Assign a unique invoice number and date.
  • Provide your business name and contact information.
  • List out the details of the product(s) or service(s) you provided — include quantity, rates, hours, etc.
  • Provide the name and contact information of the customer.
  • Highlight the subtotal.
  • Specify any payment details or a due date if necessary. 

Sounds like a lot to remember? There are a number of free invoicing tools that you can lean on to ensure you’re not leaving any important information off of your invoices.

For example, our free Invoice Template Generator aims to simplify the process by allowing you to easily create and download professional invoices to send to your customers.

HubSpot Invoice Generator.png

Simply fill in your business details in the invoice template to populate the statement, customize the color and logo to fit your brand, and download it as a PDF to be sent off to your customers.

Invoice QA

“Proof your invoice for typos, currency errors and computational mistakes. In many cases, invoices are sent to collections because the client won’t pay due to an invoicing error,” explains finance and accounting professional, Simon Speirs. 

To avoid sending off an invoice to customer containing any silly mistakes, take the time to review each invoice to ensure:

  • You’re sending it to the right contact. Invoices contain sensitive financial information. Make sure you’re routing it to the right place to avoid any legal issues.
  • You’ve got your numbers straight. Double-check itemized lines for proper quantities, hours, and prices. Revisit totals and subtotals, paying close attention to the accuracy of tax and discounts.
  • You’ve specified any additional payment details. There should be no surprise fees included on your final invoice. If you’ve added anything that hasn’t already been discussed with the customer, be sure to specify why it’s included.
  • You’re using the right currency. If you’re billing international customers, be sure that all of the currency conversions add up.
  • You’ve included your contact information. In the even that customer does have questions about the invoice, include your contact information and logo to point them in the right direction to get assistance.

Delivering & Monitoring Invoices

There are a few different ways you can actually send off your invoice to your customer. Two of the most common options?

  1. Send the invoice electronically via email or website.
  2. Send the invoice via postal mail.

Sending an invoice electronically means that you have the option to send it through email or directly from your accounting or invoicing software.

This is typically a preferred delivery method, as it allows you to send invoices quickly, as projects or orders are completed.

If you choose to send an invoice by postal mail, you’ll want to pay close attention to timing, as it may take a few days for your invoice to arrive, be processed, and then be sent back.

What happens if I don’t get paid?

Remember those payment terms you set up at the start of all of this? It’s time to review ‘em. This will help you determine whether or not the customer has violated the terms entirely, or if they are just cutting it close.

Before you do anything, reach out to the customer to provide a friendly payment reminder – this is a best practice. You can do this via email, phone, or mail – just be sure that you’re both prompt and clear in your outreach. You may find it’s best to send several follow up attempts.

If you fail to secure payment or renegotiate payment terms after following up with a customer, you’ll want to consult a trusted business advisor or lawyer to discuss next steps for pursuing the outstanding invoice.

Ready to Start Getting Paid?

Effective invoicing doesn’t happen overnight — so be patient. The important thing is that you recognize the importance of implementing an organized, agreed-upon process for keeping up with the outgoing and incoming, and you commit to making regular improvements to it. 

Disclaimer: This blog post includes some information on legal issues surrounding invoicing, but legal information is not the same as legal advice — applying the law to a specific circumstance. We’ve conducted research to better ensure that our information is accurate and useful, but we insist that you talk to a lawyer if you want professional assurance that our information, and your interpretation of it, is accurate. In a nutshell, you may not rely on this information as legal advice, nor as a recommendation or endorsement of any particular legal understanding, and you should instead see this info as for entertainment purposes only.

Invoice Template

 
Invoice Template

The Current State of SMB Invoicing [Infographic]

Spreadsheets. Emails. Paper documents. Oh my. 

If this sounds anything like your current invoicing solution, you’re not alone.

In fact, 27% of small and midsized businesses (SMBs) admitted that they have a hard time creating and sending invoices — let alone tracking them — according to a recent survey from HubSpot Research. Use the free HubSpot Invoice Template Generator to create professional  invoices in minutes.

What other invoicing challenges are SMBs facing? We’ve compiled some of the most interesting statistics for the survey below, along with a few tips on how to simplify your invoicing process for 2018.

P.S. – Check out this handy Invoice Template Generator to create free, professional invoices in minutes.

Current State of SMB Invoicing.png

Invoice Template

 
Invoice Template

Spreadsheets. Emails. Paper documents. Oh my. 

If this sounds anything like your current invoicing solution, you’re not alone.

In fact, 27% of small and midsized businesses (SMBs) admitted that they have a hard time creating and sending invoices — let alone tracking them — according to a recent survey from HubSpot Research. Use the free HubSpot Invoice Template Generator to create professional  invoices in minutes.

What other invoicing challenges are SMBs facing? We’ve compiled some of the most interesting statistics for the survey below, along with a few tips on how to simplify your invoicing process for 2018.

P.S. – Check out this handy Invoice Template Generator to create free, professional invoices in minutes.

Current State of SMB Invoicing.png

Invoice Template

 
Invoice Template

5 Creative Strategies to Stay Inspired to Write All Year [Infographic]

If there’s one thing we know about inspiration, it’s that it’s not very good at giving advance notice of anything.

It crops up at the most inopportune time — like when you’re without a pen or a device to otherwise record a brilliant idea. 

And other times, when you need it the most — it’s nowhere to be found.

It also has its very own version of low seasons, when writers are left without special events or holidays to stimulate creativity. Now that the holidays are behind us, for example, many of us are feeling deprived of prolific cheer?

But as it turns out, these claims are little more than excuses. Inspiration, it turns out, can be sought any time, anywhere.

One of our very favorite infographic artists, Henneke Duistermaat, knows this to be true — and thus compiled her thoughts on the matter in the captivating visual below.

Have a look, and discover how you can find the inspiration to write and blog — with consistency — all year.


Get-inspired-to-write-and-blog-consistently-infographic


If there’s one thing we know about inspiration, it’s that it’s not very good at giving advance notice of anything.

It crops up at the most inopportune time — like when you’re without a pen or a device to otherwise record a brilliant idea. 

And other times, when you need it the most — it’s nowhere to be found.

It also has its very own version of low seasons, when writers are left without special events or holidays to stimulate creativity. Now that the holidays are behind us, for example, many of us are feeling deprived of prolific cheer?

But as it turns out, these claims are little more than excuses. Inspiration, it turns out, can be sought any time, anywhere.

One of our very favorite infographic artists, Henneke Duistermaat, knows this to be true — and thus compiled her thoughts on the matter in the captivating visual below.

Have a look, and discover how you can find the inspiration to write and blog — with consistency — all year.


Get-inspired-to-write-and-blog-consistently-infographic


Here Are the Top Marketing Design Trends for 2018 [Infographic]

Shutterstock — a familiar name to many creative professionals — released its 2018 Creative Trends Report today, shedding light on the design trends marketers need to know about this year.

The report is the result of synthesizing and analyzing the billions of searches for visual content on Shutterstock’s collection — which boasts over 170 million images. Based on those searches, Shutterstock determined which design concepts are most likely to influence creative marketing and design this year, from pop culture to emerging trends.

This is the seventh year Shutterstock has released a Creative Trends Report, and this year, there’s a common, underlying science-fiction-esque theme — at least when it comes to the top three trends, named to be “fantasy,” “new minimalism,” and “space.”

Intrigued? Check out the full report, which — how fitting — has been visually represented by the infographic below.


1. Fantasy

Unicorns — the mythical creatures, not the high-valued startups — are cool again. Along with its friends like mermaids and centaurs, fantasy-themed images are predicted to see a rise in popularity. 

2. New Minimalism

It’s not just any minimalism — it’s the clean, circu-linear kind that uses white space to draw greater attention to an image’s boldest features.

3. Space

Elon Musk, is that you? We’re not sure if SpaceX is behind it, but images pertaining to the solar system and beyond are expected to be a major trend this year.

4. Natural Luxury

Less screen, more green. Images with natural elements are on the rise — with a touch of “geological”-themed luxury, like marble.

5. Punchy Pastels

Spring has arrived early, with pastel hues and shades dominating 2018 design trends.

6. A Global March

The legacy of last January’s Women’s March lives on — searches for terms like “activism” and key occasions like “International Women’s Day” are on the rise.

7. Cactus

Honestly, your guess is as good as ours on this one. As Shutterstock describes it, this trend reflects “nature’s ultimate survivor” with “beauty and danger.”

8. Digital Crafts

It’s the latest generation of origami. Is a robot capable of crafting? Inquiring, visual minds want to know.

9. Ancient Geometrics

You might be familiar with the Mandala, which is an ancient, geometric symbol frequently associated with Hinduism and Buddhism. There’s been an uptick in searches for that type of image — a trend we expect to continue as many seek these zen-like images.

10. Cryptocurrency

We’re not at all surprised to see this one on the list. Cryptocurrency has been a major point for those in both tech and finance in recent months, with such headlines as bitcoin debuting on Wall Street and Kodak unveiling its very own cryptocurrency (which resulted in its stock price skyrocketing in an impressively short period of time).

11. Holographic Foil

Tech has been gradually permeating the mainstream and pop-cultural conversation, and that’s arguably never been truer than it has been in 2018. Holographics have long served as thematic, visual representation of tech — which is what we predict helped it earn a place on the list.

Shutterstock — a familiar name to many creative professionals — released its 2018 Creative Trends Report today, shedding light on the design trends marketers need to know about this year.

The report is the result of synthesizing and analyzing the billions of searches for visual content on Shutterstock’s collection — which boasts over 170 million images. Based on those searches, Shutterstock determined which design concepts are most likely to influence creative marketing and design this year, from pop culture to emerging trends.

This is the seventh year Shutterstock has released a Creative Trends Report, and this year, there’s a common, underlying science-fiction-esque theme — at least when it comes to the top three trends, named to be “fantasy,” “new minimalism,” and “space.”

Intrigued? Check out the full report, which — how fitting — has been visually represented by the infographic below.


1. Fantasy

Unicorns — the mythical creatures, not the high-valued startups — are cool again. Along with its friends like mermaids and centaurs, fantasy-themed images are predicted to see a rise in popularity. 

2. New Minimalism

It’s not just any minimalism — it’s the clean, circu-linear kind that uses white space to draw greater attention to an image’s boldest features.

3. Space

Elon Musk, is that you? We’re not sure if SpaceX is behind it, but images pertaining to the solar system and beyond are expected to be a major trend this year.

4. Natural Luxury

Less screen, more green. Images with natural elements are on the rise — with a touch of “geological”-themed luxury, like marble.

5. Punchy Pastels

Spring has arrived early, with pastel hues and shades dominating 2018 design trends.

6. A Global March

The legacy of last January’s Women’s March lives on — searches for terms like “activism” and key occasions like “International Women’s Day” are on the rise.

7. Cactus

Honestly, your guess is as good as ours on this one. As Shutterstock describes it, this trend reflects “nature’s ultimate survivor” with “beauty and danger.”

8. Digital Crafts

It’s the latest generation of origami. Is a robot capable of crafting? Inquiring, visual minds want to know.

9. Ancient Geometrics

You might be familiar with the Mandala, which is an ancient, geometric symbol frequently associated with Hinduism and Buddhism. There’s been an uptick in searches for that type of image — a trend we expect to continue as many seek these zen-like images.

10. Cryptocurrency

We’re not at all surprised to see this one on the list. Cryptocurrency has been a major point for those in both tech and finance in recent months, with such headlines as bitcoin debuting on Wall Street and Kodak unveiling its very own cryptocurrency (which resulted in its stock price skyrocketing in an impressively short period of time).

11. Holographic Foil

Tech has been gradually permeating the mainstream and pop-cultural conversation, and that’s arguably never been truer than it has been in 2018. Holographics have long served as thematic, visual representation of tech — which is what we predict helped it earn a place on the list.

YouTube Just Made It Harder to Monetize Videos: Here’s Why

YouTube announced yesterday that it has modified the eligibility requirements for its Partner Program (YPP), which will change the ways and ability Creators can monetize their content on the platform.

Here’s what we know so far — and how marketers can prepare.

What YouTube’s New Partner Program Requirements Mean for Marketers

Changes to the YouTube Partner Program 

Beginning February 20 of this year — 30 days from now — Creators must have accrued 4,000 hours of watch time over the past year, in addition to 1,000 channel subscribers, the official statement explained. Compare that to previous eligibility requirements of only 10,000 lifetime views, as of last April.

Creators who do not currently meet those requirements have the next 30 days to reach those numbers. Otherwise, YouTube says, they will no longer be eligible for monetization, effective February 20.

However, even if Creators do meet that deadline, there doesn’t appear to be any guarantee that they will be eligible for YPP — rather, YouTube says, the only promise is that they’ll be “re-evaluated under strict criteria” to determine acceptance into the program.

Why YouTube Is Doing This

Last week, we reported on some changes to the Facebook News Feed that will make content from friends and family — as opposed to brands — more visible to users. That action, we predicted, was largely in response the scrutiny the network has received after being weaponized to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

YouTube, for its part, faced similar scrutiny in 2017 — its parent company, Google, is expected to appear before U.S. Congress today with specific, actionable information on how it plans to prevent such meddling and weaponization in the future.

That could explain the timing of this particular announcement, as stricter YouTube monetization requirements will likely play a role in Google’s overall content and guideline modification efforts.

However, YouTube also came under fire last month after one of its highest-earning creators, Logan Paul, posted graphic and offensive content to his channel. Since then, the channel has severed ties Paul has a preferred ad partner. 

What Marketers Can Do Now

YouTube, for its part, is downplaying the impact that these changes will have on Creators, at least when it comes to the loss of revenue.

According to the statement, 99% of Creators who do not meet the new requirements have, on average, earned less than $100 annually (over the past year).

And what income they have accrued prior to the February 20th deadline, YouTube says, they will still receive — based on Google’s AdSense policies.

YouTube has not made it clear, however, if Creators who reach these numbers after February 20th will still be eligible to apply for its partner program, though we will be keeping an eye on more specific information in its guidelines over the next few weeks.

Marcus Andrews, HubSpot’s senior product marketing manager, points out that with these new requirements, users will see far fewer ads on one-time viral videos from Creators who don’t otherwise meet the mandatory metrics. 

“The switch from a requirement of 10,000 lifetime views to 4,000 hours of watch time in the past year will surely stop monetization opportunities for a lot of legacy viral video creators,” he explains. “However, it will put more of a focus on people who are higher-quality content. Watch time is a much better signal of quality than views.”

So while accruing thousands of hours of views and subscribers within a 30-day period is no easy task, the same rule applies here as it would to build an audience on any social media channel: Create high-quality, personalized content that’s relevant to the audience you’re trying to reach.

Our comprehensive collection of tactical YouTube marketing content dives into these specifics, ranging from how to optimize videos for SEO and ranking, to how to run an ad campaign on the platform.

As always, feel free to reach out with your thoughts and questions on Twitter.

YouTube announced yesterday that it has modified the eligibility requirements for its Partner Program (YPP), which will change the ways and ability Creators can monetize their content on the platform.

Here’s what we know so far — and how marketers can prepare.

What YouTube’s New Partner Program Requirements Mean for Marketers

Changes to the YouTube Partner Program 

Beginning February 20 of this year — 30 days from now — Creators must have accrued 4,000 hours of watch time over the past year, in addition to 1,000 channel subscribers, the official statement explained. Compare that to previous eligibility requirements of only 10,000 lifetime views, as of last April.

Creators who do not currently meet those requirements have the next 30 days to reach those numbers. Otherwise, YouTube says, they will no longer be eligible for monetization, effective February 20.

However, even if Creators do meet that deadline, there doesn’t appear to be any guarantee that they will be eligible for YPP — rather, YouTube says, the only promise is that they’ll be “re-evaluated under strict criteria” to determine acceptance into the program.

Why YouTube Is Doing This

Last week, we reported on some changes to the Facebook News Feed that will make content from friends and family — as opposed to brands — more visible to users. That action, we predicted, was largely in response the scrutiny the network has received after being weaponized to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

YouTube, for its part, faced similar scrutiny in 2017 — its parent company, Google, is expected to appear before U.S. Congress today with specific, actionable information on how it plans to prevent such meddling and weaponization in the future.

That could explain the timing of this particular announcement, as stricter YouTube monetization requirements will likely play a role in Google’s overall content and guideline modification efforts.

However, YouTube also came under fire last month after one of its highest-earning creators, Logan Paul, posted graphic and offensive content to his channel. Since then, the channel has severed ties Paul has a preferred ad partner. 

What Marketers Can Do Now

YouTube, for its part, is downplaying the impact that these changes will have on Creators, at least when it comes to the loss of revenue.

According to the statement, 99% of Creators who do not meet the new requirements have, on average, earned less than $100 annually (over the past year).

And what income they have accrued prior to the February 20th deadline, YouTube says, they will still receive — based on Google’s AdSense policies.

YouTube has not made it clear, however, if Creators who reach these numbers after February 20th will still be eligible to apply for its partner program, though we will be keeping an eye on more specific information in its guidelines over the next few weeks.

Marcus Andrews, HubSpot’s senior product marketing manager, points out that with these new requirements, users will see far fewer ads on one-time viral videos from Creators who don’t otherwise meet the mandatory metrics. 

“The switch from a requirement of 10,000 lifetime views to 4,000 hours of watch time in the past year will surely stop monetization opportunities for a lot of legacy viral video creators,” he explains. “However, it will put more of a focus on people who are higher-quality content. Watch time is a much better signal of quality than views.”

So while accruing thousands of hours of views and subscribers within a 30-day period is no easy task, the same rule applies here as it would to build an audience on any social media channel: Create high-quality, personalized content that’s relevant to the audience you’re trying to reach.

Our comprehensive collection of tactical YouTube marketing content dives into these specifics, ranging from how to optimize videos for SEO and ranking, to how to run an ad campaign on the platform.

As always, feel free to reach out with your thoughts and questions on Twitter.