9 Best Practices for Creating a High Converting Pricing Page (With Examples)

Your pricing page is one of the most important parts of your website. It’s where all your effort in building a relationship with your customer finally leads to a sale.

But I’ve seen enough badly designed pricing pages to know that some businesses simply don’t know how to sell their offer. They either get confused on how much to charge, especially if they offer services, or don’t know how to demonstrate value on the price page.

Build and promote landing pages that generate more leads with the help of this  free optimization guide.

Knowing the fundamentals of a good pricing page is important because simply copying the pricing page of another business without understanding why it’s designed the way it is, will only lead to a poorly optimized page.

Businesses too often forget the human element. Even though we buy all the time, when it comes to selling we forget the internal processes we go through before making a purchase.

In this post, I’ll share nine best practices to ensure your pricing page does what it’s supposed to do, make sales happen.

9 Pricing Page Best Practices

1. Keep your language simple and straightforward.

Buyers don’t like confusion. They’re about to give you their hard earned money and they want the entire process to be as clear as possible. In essence, they want to know what exactly they’re paying for and what it’s going to do for them. Your pricing page should clearly convey what your product or service will do for the buyer. Your pricing page is not the place to get witty or show expertise with hard to grasp grammar.

Making your pricing page as simple as possible should be at the core of your entire design.

The SaaS DNA project found that ease of understanding is crucial for visitors, so the best pricing pages for companies are often the simplest. The study recommends that pricing pages should stick to simplicity.

Dollar Shave Club is a brand synonymous with humor and eccentricity. Yet even they know that clear, easy to understand language beats being witty when it comes to talking price.

2. Limit your pricing plans to a few options.

The theme of simplicity extends beyond language. Even your price plans should be easy to understand. While this can be difficult if you serve multiple customer segments, complex price plans do limit sales. The less your buyer has to think before choosing a plan the better your conversion rate will be.

Take a page from Groove, they initially had a complicated pricing page that had a conversion rate of 1.17%.

Image source

And their conversion rate increased by 350% when they simplified their pricing page.

Due to the nature of what you offer, having one price plan isn’t always an option. You can fix the issue of complex pricing by offering a customizable plan instead.

You can do this by offering: A ‘contact us’ option for enterprise: Where people can get in touch for a tailored plan.

Sliding scale plan: Where buyers can view price and features with a simple interactive element.

Campaign Monitor captures the essence of a customizable plan with both a sliding scale and an option for more demanding businesses. They save their customers from going through an otherwise complicated buying process.

Image source

3. Reduce friction points.

Friction points, also known as FUDs (fear, uncertainties and doubts), are factors that keep people from buying — and you’ve probably experienced them yourself as a buyer.

There are several ways to reduce friction points:

Add FAQs to your pricing page

Have a chat with your customer service team and create a list of the most common questions potential buyers ask and answer them on your pricing page.

Include live chat

Something that’s becoming more popular by the day, is presenting buyers with an option to speak with a sales rep. Especially if you sell expensive products, buyers can get questions unique to them answered in a personalized way.

Offer a free trial or money-back guarantee

Before purchasing most people wonder if a service or product will meet their particular need, this objection might be strong enough to make them cancel a purchase. Businesses avoid this by offering a free trial for services or a money back guarantee for physical products.

Include testimonials

What other people can say about your business matters more than anything you can say about it. When people see others like them achieving success with your product they feel more confident about buying.

Adespresso deals with friction points on their pricing page by offering testimonials, answering FAQs and displaying the logos of companies already using their service.

Image source

4. Utilize price anchoring.

Imagine you’re in a store for a watch and the store clerk shows you a $20,000 watch, your pulse quickens, then she displays the $12,000 variety and then finally a $2,000 watch. Psychology tells us that you’d probably see the $2,000 watch as cheap even though on it’s own you would’ve judged its price as too high.

A study conducted by the University of Arizona revealed that participants were more likely to judge a house as a bargain when it was placed next to an identical building with an artificially inflated price. Regardless of whether they were inexperienced undergrad students or real estate experts. This is because we tend to judge things based on what we were exposed to prior.

Price anchoring is applied in pricing pages by displaying the most expensive plans first. To test the effect of this on pricing pages, Conversionxl conducted a study and used task scenarios, eye-tracking and survey tools to gather feedback.

The result of the study revealed that participants chose more expensive packages more often when they were listed first, or furthest left in left-right order.

They found that why people generally took in the information at the same, listing the expensive plans first on the left resulted in longer ‘dwell times’ on the page. Overall the first two positions received the most attention.

Here’s a bar graph of the results when participants were asked to choose a plan.

image8-6

Image source

The participants chose the Pro plan more when it was offered first.

Here’s how Unbounce, a company that knows a thing or two about optimization, designs their pricing page.

Image source

5. Highlight a recommended plan.

You know better than anyone what option would fit the needs of the majority of your customers. Reduce the confusion faced by buyers by highlighting a plan you think will be a good fit for the majority of visitors.

It shouldn’t just be your most expensive plan though — it has to be a price plan that based on evidence, most of your customers will derive value from. And there’s proof that highlighting a plan works to reduce pricing page friction and buyer confusion.

Another study conducted by ConversionXL examined how highlighting a recommended plan impacted results.

Here’s a table showing the results of the study.

Image source

The major takeaway from the study is that participants chose the PRO plan more often when it was highlighted, especially if it was placed in the expensive first order.

6. Add the number nine to prices.

Also known as psychological or charm pricing. It’s based on the theory that certain prices have a psychological impact. And you’ve probably seen this effect used in grocery stores and car slots.

Though not supported by everyone, some studies do show that charm prices work, for example, an experiment conducted by MIT and the University of Chicago found that clothing items at a women store sold more when it was priced at $39 than when it only cost $34 and even $44.

In another study, Gumroad shows how the number nine improves conversion rates.

Image source

7. Make the CTA prominent.

The CTA is crucial to the success of your pricing page. Your CTA has to stand out and clearly convey what you want your readers to do. It shouldn’t be blocked by features and price.

Also, the wording in you CTA matter, for example, research done by HubSpot found that the word ‘submit’ negatively affects conversion rates.

Your CTA has to be in essence: Prominent, actionable, and specific. The best CTAs start with a verb and tell the reader what they’ll get by taking action.

Here’s how Sprout Social does it.

Image source

8. Improve information and action

The SaaS DNA project, which I cited earlier, also revealed that pricing pages that had the most information and were action-oriented resulted in more confident users who in turn converted better. The study showed that pages that lacked either information or action resulted in lower conversions.

Image source

The study advised that for a pricing page to be both informative and actionable people should be able to connect the dots between what each plan offered, and how they would actually apply the offerings in their own lives. An indicator that you’re on the right track, is if a new user can understand your pricing page.

Here’s an example from Box, a company that ranks highly in the SaaS DNA high information and action category.

Image source

Easy to understand and actionable.

Box not only segments pricing by customer base so as not to overwhelm buyers, but each section clearly tells you what you get and how to get it.

9. Never stop testing.

As with anything in optimization, you have to keep testing. What works for one company might not work for yours and the only way to make sure that the features you implement are the best they can be is to test continuously. But these best practices provide you with guidelines to help you decide on what features to implement in your pricing page for better conversions.

how to design landing pages that convert

 
how to design landing pages for conversion

Your pricing page is one of the most important parts of your website. It’s where all your effort in building a relationship with your customer finally leads to a sale.

But I’ve seen enough badly designed pricing pages to know that some businesses simply don’t know how to sell their offer. They either get confused on how much to charge, especially if they offer services, or don’t know how to demonstrate value on the price page.

Build and promote landing pages that generate more leads with the help of this  free optimization guide.

Knowing the fundamentals of a good pricing page is important because simply copying the pricing page of another business without understanding why it’s designed the way it is, will only lead to a poorly optimized page.

Businesses too often forget the human element. Even though we buy all the time, when it comes to selling we forget the internal processes we go through before making a purchase.

In this post, I’ll share nine best practices to ensure your pricing page does what it’s supposed to do, make sales happen.

9 Pricing Page Best Practices

1. Keep your language simple and straightforward.

Buyers don’t like confusion. They’re about to give you their hard earned money and they want the entire process to be as clear as possible. In essence, they want to know what exactly they’re paying for and what it’s going to do for them. Your pricing page should clearly convey what your product or service will do for the buyer. Your pricing page is not the place to get witty or show expertise with hard to grasp grammar.

Making your pricing page as simple as possible should be at the core of your entire design.

The SaaS DNA project found that ease of understanding is crucial for visitors, so the best pricing pages for companies are often the simplest. The study recommends that pricing pages should stick to simplicity.

Dollar Shave Club is a brand synonymous with humor and eccentricity. Yet even they know that clear, easy to understand language beats being witty when it comes to talking price.

2. Limit your pricing plans to a few options.

The theme of simplicity extends beyond language. Even your price plans should be easy to understand. While this can be difficult if you serve multiple customer segments, complex price plans do limit sales. The less your buyer has to think before choosing a plan the better your conversion rate will be.

Take a page from Groove, they initially had a complicated pricing page that had a conversion rate of 1.17%.

Image source

And their conversion rate increased by 350% when they simplified their pricing page.

Due to the nature of what you offer, having one price plan isn’t always an option. You can fix the issue of complex pricing by offering a customizable plan instead.

You can do this by offering: A ‘contact us’ option for enterprise: Where people can get in touch for a tailored plan.

Sliding scale plan: Where buyers can view price and features with a simple interactive element.

Campaign Monitor captures the essence of a customizable plan with both a sliding scale and an option for more demanding businesses. They save their customers from going through an otherwise complicated buying process.

Image source

3. Reduce friction points.

Friction points, also known as FUDs (fear, uncertainties and doubts), are factors that keep people from buying — and you’ve probably experienced them yourself as a buyer.

There are several ways to reduce friction points:

Add FAQs to your pricing page

Have a chat with your customer service team and create a list of the most common questions potential buyers ask and answer them on your pricing page.

Include live chat

Something that’s becoming more popular by the day, is presenting buyers with an option to speak with a sales rep. Especially if you sell expensive products, buyers can get questions unique to them answered in a personalized way.

Offer a free trial or money-back guarantee

Before purchasing most people wonder if a service or product will meet their particular need, this objection might be strong enough to make them cancel a purchase. Businesses avoid this by offering a free trial for services or a money back guarantee for physical products.

Include testimonials

What other people can say about your business matters more than anything you can say about it. When people see others like them achieving success with your product they feel more confident about buying.

Adespresso deals with friction points on their pricing page by offering testimonials, answering FAQs and displaying the logos of companies already using their service.

Image source

4. Utilize price anchoring.

Imagine you’re in a store for a watch and the store clerk shows you a $20,000 watch, your pulse quickens, then she displays the $12,000 variety and then finally a $2,000 watch. Psychology tells us that you’d probably see the $2,000 watch as cheap even though on it’s own you would’ve judged its price as too high.

A study conducted by the University of Arizona revealed that participants were more likely to judge a house as a bargain when it was placed next to an identical building with an artificially inflated price. Regardless of whether they were inexperienced undergrad students or real estate experts. This is because we tend to judge things based on what we were exposed to prior.

Price anchoring is applied in pricing pages by displaying the most expensive plans first. To test the effect of this on pricing pages, Conversionxl conducted a study and used task scenarios, eye-tracking and survey tools to gather feedback.

The result of the study revealed that participants chose more expensive packages more often when they were listed first, or furthest left in left-right order.

They found that why people generally took in the information at the same, listing the expensive plans first on the left resulted in longer ‘dwell times’ on the page. Overall the first two positions received the most attention.

Here’s a bar graph of the results when participants were asked to choose a plan.

image8-6

Image source

The participants chose the Pro plan more when it was offered first.

Here’s how Unbounce, a company that knows a thing or two about optimization, designs their pricing page.

Image source

5. Highlight a recommended plan.

You know better than anyone what option would fit the needs of the majority of your customers. Reduce the confusion faced by buyers by highlighting a plan you think will be a good fit for the majority of visitors.

It shouldn’t just be your most expensive plan though — it has to be a price plan that based on evidence, most of your customers will derive value from. And there’s proof that highlighting a plan works to reduce pricing page friction and buyer confusion.

Another study conducted by ConversionXL examined how highlighting a recommended plan impacted results.

Here’s a table showing the results of the study.

Image source

The major takeaway from the study is that participants chose the PRO plan more often when it was highlighted, especially if it was placed in the expensive first order.

6. Add the number nine to prices.

Also known as psychological or charm pricing. It’s based on the theory that certain prices have a psychological impact. And you’ve probably seen this effect used in grocery stores and car slots.

Though not supported by everyone, some studies do show that charm prices work, for example, an experiment conducted by MIT and the University of Chicago found that clothing items at a women store sold more when it was priced at $39 than when it only cost $34 and even $44.

In another study, Gumroad shows how the number nine improves conversion rates.

Image source

7. Make the CTA prominent.

The CTA is crucial to the success of your pricing page. Your CTA has to stand out and clearly convey what you want your readers to do. It shouldn’t be blocked by features and price.

Also, the wording in you CTA matter, for example, research done by HubSpot found that the word ‘submit’ negatively affects conversion rates.

Your CTA has to be in essence: Prominent, actionable, and specific. The best CTAs start with a verb and tell the reader what they’ll get by taking action.

Here’s how Sprout Social does it.

Image source

8. Improve information and action

The SaaS DNA project, which I cited earlier, also revealed that pricing pages that had the most information and were action-oriented resulted in more confident users who in turn converted better. The study showed that pages that lacked either information or action resulted in lower conversions.

Image source

The study advised that for a pricing page to be both informative and actionable people should be able to connect the dots between what each plan offered, and how they would actually apply the offerings in their own lives. An indicator that you’re on the right track, is if a new user can understand your pricing page.

Here’s an example from Box, a company that ranks highly in the SaaS DNA high information and action category.

Image source

Easy to understand and actionable.

Box not only segments pricing by customer base so as not to overwhelm buyers, but each section clearly tells you what you get and how to get it.

9. Never stop testing.

As with anything in optimization, you have to keep testing. What works for one company might not work for yours and the only way to make sure that the features you implement are the best they can be is to test continuously. But these best practices provide you with guidelines to help you decide on what features to implement in your pricing page for better conversions.

how to design landing pages that convert

 
how to design landing pages for conversion

47% of Social Media Users Report Seeing More Spam in Their Feeds, Even as Networks Fight to Stop It

Over the past two years, social media networks have made no secret of their efforts to fight the spread of spam on their sites. 

It largely began when it was revealed that foreign actors had weaponized Facebook to spread misinformation and divisive content in hopes of influencing the 2016 U.S. presidential election. 

It was then revealed that Facebook was not alone in that phenomenon — and that some of its fellow Big Tech peers, like Twitter and Google, were also being leveraged by the same or similar foreign actors to influence the election. 

That’s prompted these companies to take action — publicly.

Facebook has released a number of statements since this revelation about its efforts to emphasize news from “trusted sources” and change its algorithm to focus on friends and family. Twitter released an request for proposals to study the “health” of its network and began sweeping account removals. YouTube, which is owned by Google, made its own efforts to add more context to videos on its platform.

So, how have these efforts been paying off — and are users noticing them?

According to our data, the survey largely says: No. Here’s what we found.

47% of Social Media Users Report Seeing More Spam in Their Feeds

Seeing Spam

The controversy surrounding social media networks and the way they manage, distribute, or suppress content shows no signs of slowing down. Just this week, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee held a hearing — the second one this year — on the “filtering practices” of social media networks, where representatives from Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter testified.

But for all the publicity around these tech giants fixing the aforementioned flaws (and answering to lawmakers in the process), many users aren’t reporting any improvement.

In our survey of 542 internet users across the U.S., UK, and Canada, only 20% reported seeing less spam in their social media feeds over the past month. Nearly half, meanwhile, reported seeing more.

In the past month, have you noticed more or less spam on your social media feeds_

Data collected using Lucid

That figure could indicate a number of things. First, it’s important to note that what constitutes spam is somewhat subjective. Facebook, for its part, defines spam as “contacting people with unwanted content or requests [like] sending bulk messages, excessively posting links or images to people’s timelines and sending friend requests to people you don’t know personally.”

Something like fake news, for instance, does not seem to fall under that definition — but according to our research, about 79% of people seem to think that it generally counts as spam.

Do you think _spam_ content on social media includes fake news_

Data collected using Lucid. Survey sample = 375 internet users from the U.S. and Canada.

Facebook has struggled to define “fake news,” despite CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s best efforts in his congressional hearings and a recent interview with Kara Swisher on Recode Decode

Recent reports have also emerged that Facebook content moderators are sometimes instructed to take a “hands-off” approach to content that some might consider spam, according to The Verge — such as “flagged and reported content like graphic violence, hate speech, and racist and other bigoted rhetoric from far-right groups.”

That contrasts some testimony from Facebook’s VP of Global Policy Management Monika Bickert at this week’s hearing, as well as much of what Zuckerberg recounted in his interview with Swisher.

The company has previously spoken to the subjectivity challenges of moderating hate speech, and released a statement how it plans to address these reports.

However, the recent findings that content moderators are instructed not to remove content that leans in a particular political direction — even if it violates Facebook’s terms or policies — contradicts the greater emphasis the company has said it’s placing on a positive (and safe) user experience over ad revenue.

The Fight Against Election Meddling

We also ran a second survey — of of 579 internet users across the U.S., UK, and Canada — to measure the public perception of Facebook’s specific efforts to fight election meddling.

Here, respondents indicated a bit more confidence, with about 28% reporting that they think the company’s battle against the use of its platform to interfere with elections will work.

Do you think the actions Facebook has taken to prevent election meddling will work_

Data collected using Lucid

But almost as many people who believe the efforts are futile also seem to be uncertain — which could indicate a widespread confusion over what, exactly, the company is doing to prevent the same weaponization of its platform that previously took place.

It’s an area where Facebook fell short, Zuckerberg told Swisher, because it was “too slow to identify this new kind of attack, which was a coordinated online information operation.” To be more proactive, he — and many of his big tech peers — have identified artificial intelligence (AI) systems that can identify and flag this type of behavior quicker than human intervention can.

But AI is also widely misunderstood, with some reports of people fearing it without knowing just how frequently they use it day-to-day. That lends itself to a degree of indecision over whether — and if — Facebook and its social media counterparts will be successful in its heavily AI-dependent efforts to curb this type of activity.

One item to consider when it comes to both surveys and their corresponding results is the aspect of salience. Right now, the potential misuse of social media is top-of-mind for many, likely due to the prevalence of hearings like the one that took place this week and its presence in the news cycle. 

That could sway the public perception of spam — and how much of it they’re seeing — as well as the efficacy of social media’s fight against election interference.

When HubSpot VP Meghan Anderson saw the data, “my first reaction was that people just have a heightened awareness of it at this moment.”

“It’s part of our global dialogue,” she explains. “There are apology ads running on TV. The impact of misinformation and spam is still setting in.”

But with the issue of prevalence and clarity also comes the topic of trust.

“What I think the data does show,” Anderson says, “is that when you lose someone’s trust, that distrust lingers for long after you’ve made changes to remedy it.”

Over the past two years, social media networks have made no secret of their efforts to fight the spread of spam on their sites. 

It largely began when it was revealed that foreign actors had weaponized Facebook to spread misinformation and divisive content in hopes of influencing the 2016 U.S. presidential election. 

It was then revealed that Facebook was not alone in that phenomenon — and that some of its fellow Big Tech peers, like Twitter and Google, were also being leveraged by the same or similar foreign actors to influence the election. 

That’s prompted these companies to take action — publicly.

Facebook has released a number of statements since this revelation about its efforts to emphasize news from “trusted sources” and change its algorithm to focus on friends and family. Twitter released an request for proposals to study the “health” of its network and began sweeping account removals. YouTube, which is owned by Google, made its own efforts to add more context to videos on its platform.

So, how have these efforts been paying off — and are users noticing them?

According to our data, the survey largely says: No. Here’s what we found.

47% of Social Media Users Report Seeing More Spam in Their Feeds

Seeing Spam

The controversy surrounding social media networks and the way they manage, distribute, or suppress content shows no signs of slowing down. Just this week, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee held a hearing — the second one this year — on the “filtering practices” of social media networks, where representatives from Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter testified.

But for all the publicity around these tech giants fixing the aforementioned flaws (and answering to lawmakers in the process), many users aren’t reporting any improvement.

In our survey of 542 internet users across the U.S., UK, and Canada, only 20% reported seeing less spam in their social media feeds over the past month. Nearly half, meanwhile, reported seeing more.

In the past month, have you noticed more or less spam on your social media feeds_

Data collected using Lucid

That figure could indicate a number of things. First, it’s important to note that what constitutes spam is somewhat subjective. Facebook, for its part, defines spam as “contacting people with unwanted content or requests [like] sending bulk messages, excessively posting links or images to people’s timelines and sending friend requests to people you don’t know personally.”

Something like fake news, for instance, does not seem to fall under that definition — but according to our research, about 79% of people seem to think that it generally counts as spam.

Do you think _spam_ content on social media includes fake news_

Data collected using Lucid. Survey sample = 375 internet users from the U.S. and Canada.

Facebook has struggled to define “fake news,” despite CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s best efforts in his congressional hearings and a recent interview with Kara Swisher on Recode Decode

Recent reports have also emerged that Facebook content moderators are sometimes instructed to take a “hands-off” approach to content that some might consider spam, according to The Verge — such as “flagged and reported content like graphic violence, hate speech, and racist and other bigoted rhetoric from far-right groups.”

That contrasts some testimony from Facebook’s VP of Global Policy Management Monika Bickert at this week’s hearing, as well as much of what Zuckerberg recounted in his interview with Swisher.

The company has previously spoken to the subjectivity challenges of moderating hate speech, and released a statement how it plans to address these reports.

However, the recent findings that content moderators are instructed not to remove content that leans in a particular political direction — even if it violates Facebook’s terms or policies — contradicts the greater emphasis the company has said it’s placing on a positive (and safe) user experience over ad revenue.

The Fight Against Election Meddling

We also ran a second survey — of of 579 internet users across the U.S., UK, and Canada — to measure the public perception of Facebook’s specific efforts to fight election meddling.

Here, respondents indicated a bit more confidence, with about 28% reporting that they think the company’s battle against the use of its platform to interfere with elections will work.

Do you think the actions Facebook has taken to prevent election meddling will work_

Data collected using Lucid

But almost as many people who believe the efforts are futile also seem to be uncertain — which could indicate a widespread confusion over what, exactly, the company is doing to prevent the same weaponization of its platform that previously took place.

It’s an area where Facebook fell short, Zuckerberg told Swisher, because it was “too slow to identify this new kind of attack, which was a coordinated online information operation.” To be more proactive, he — and many of his big tech peers — have identified artificial intelligence (AI) systems that can identify and flag this type of behavior quicker than human intervention can.

But AI is also widely misunderstood, with some reports of people fearing it without knowing just how frequently they use it day-to-day. That lends itself to a degree of indecision over whether — and if — Facebook and its social media counterparts will be successful in its heavily AI-dependent efforts to curb this type of activity.

One item to consider when it comes to both surveys and their corresponding results is the aspect of salience. Right now, the potential misuse of social media is top-of-mind for many, likely due to the prevalence of hearings like the one that took place this week and its presence in the news cycle. 

That could sway the public perception of spam — and how much of it they’re seeing — as well as the efficacy of social media’s fight against election interference.

When HubSpot VP Meghan Anderson saw the data, “my first reaction was that people just have a heightened awareness of it at this moment.”

“It’s part of our global dialogue,” she explains. “There are apology ads running on TV. The impact of misinformation and spam is still setting in.”

But with the issue of prevalence and clarity also comes the topic of trust.

“What I think the data does show,” Anderson says, “is that when you lose someone’s trust, that distrust lingers for long after you’ve made changes to remedy it.”

Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience

One of my favorite things about content marketing is the ability to create an experience. Instead of buying a single ad, you can use different kinds of content to do different work strategically. This week on Copyblogger, we shared ways content can create an experience for your audience and help you strategically move people in … Continue reading “Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience”

The post Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience appeared first on Wicked Baron's Emporium.

One of my favorite things about content marketing is the ability to create an experience. Instead of buying a single ad, you can use different kinds of content to do different work strategically. This week on Copyblogger, we shared ways content can create an experience for your audience and help you strategically move people in … Continue reading “Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience”

The post Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience appeared first on Wicked Baron's Emporium.

Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience


One of my favorite things about content marketing is the ability to create an experience. Instead of buying a single ad, you can use different kinds of content to do different work strategically. This week on Copyblogger, we shared ways content can create an experience for your audience and help you strategically move people in
Read More…

The post Create Content Success with a Cohesive Content Experience appeared first on Copyblogger.



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43 Handy Excel Shortcuts You Can't Live Without

Many marketers use Microsoft Excel every day, whether it’s to create a chart, analyze data, or run a report to present at the next team meeting.

Creating reports like these in Excel is time-consuming enough. How can we spend a little less time navigating, formatting, selecting, and entering formulas for our data? Wouldn’t it be great if there were keyboard shortcuts that could help us get our work done faster?

So glad you asked.

We’ve put together a list of 43 keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft Excel. Although you can do all of these maneuvers manually, knowing these tricks will help save you time so you can focus on the stuff that really matters.

Click here to download our collection of free Excel templates that will make  your life easier.

All of these shortcuts can be accessed on PC and Mac, so we’ve included both types below where applicable.

(Note for Mac users: To access the F keys (F1–F12), you’ll have to hold the Fn key before pressing any F key — unless you’ve enabled those keys as standard function keys.)

43 Excel Shortcuts You’ll Definitely Want to Bookmark

Navigation Shortcuts

These simple shortcuts can help you navigate between workbooks, sheets, rows and columns:

Move up through a selection Shift + Enter (PC and Mac)
Jump to the top of a column CTRL + ↑ (PC); Command + ↑ (Mac)
Jump to the bottom of a column CTRL + ↓ (PC); Command + ↓ (Mac)
Jump to the corner of a selection (Note: Rotate to each corner by repeating this keystroke) CTRL + . (PC and Mac)
Close the active workbook window CTRL + w (PC); Command + W (Mac)
Switch to previous workbook window CTRL + Shift + F6 (PC); Command + Shift + F6 (Mac)
Switch to the next open worksheet CTRL + Tab (Mac only)
Switch to the previous open worksheet (Mac) CTRL + Shift + Tab (Mac only)
Start a new chart sheet F11 (PC and Mac)
Insert a new sheet Shift + F11 (PC and Mac)
Repeat the last action CTRL + y (PC); Command + Y (Mac)
Fill selected cell with the content in the cell above selected cell CTRL + d (PC and Mac)
Fill selected cell with the content in the cell to the left of selected cell CTRL + r (PC and Mac)

Format Shortcuts

Formatting in Excel can be difficult if you don’t know of what you’re doing. Here are a few shortcuts that to help you easily format your cells. To start, here’s a featured formatting shortcut you might not have known about:

Find and replace values CTRL + F (PC); Command + F (Mac)
Show all values as percentages CTRL + Shift + % (PC and Mac)
Show all values as currency (Note: Replace $ with your own country’s currency key) CTRL + Shift + $ (PC and Mac)
Show all values in general number format CTRL + Shift + ~ (PC and Mac)
Apply or remove bold formatting to selected cells CTRL + 2 (PC); Command + b (Mac)
Apply or remove italic formatting to selected cells CTRL + 3 (PC); Command + i (Mac)
Hide selected rows CTRL + 9 (PC and Mac)
Unhide selected rows CTRL + Shift + ( (PC and Mac)
Hide selected columns CTRL + 0 (PC and Mac)
Unhide selected columns CTRL + Shift + ) (PC and Mac)
Insert current date CTRL + ; (PC and Mac)
Insert current time CTRL + Shift + : (PC); Command + ; (Mac)
Insert a hyperlink CTRL + k (PC); Command + k (Mac)
Apply an outline border to selected cells (see screenshot below) CTRL + Shift + & (PC); Command + Option + 0 (Mac)

Here’s what cells look like with (left) and without (right) a border:

Excel spreadsheet with no border outline Excel spreadsheet with outline border applied around cells

Shortcuts for Selecting Rows & Columns

Save yourself the manual dragging and selecting rows and columns with these handy keyboard tricks. To start, here are two featured rows-related shortcuts you might not have known about:

Expand the selection by one cell either upward (↑) or downward (↓) Shift + ↑ [or] Shift + (PC and Mac)
Expand the selection to the last non-empty cell CTRL + Shift + Arrow Key (PC); Command + Shift + Arrow Key (Mac)
Select entire column CTRL + [spacebar] (PC and Mac)
Select entire row Shift + [spacebar] (PC and Mac)
Select entire sheet CTRL + a (PC); Command + a (Mac)
Select only the visible cells in the current selection Alt + ; (PC); Command + Shift + z (Mac)

Formula Shortcuts

Formulas are a huge part of every marketer’s Excel toolkit. Here are a few shortcuts that’ll make you a formula wiz:

Start a formula (e.g. “=A4+A5”) = (i.e. press the “equals” sign; PC and Mac)
Insert AutoSum formula Alt + (PC); Command + Shift + t (Mac)
Edit active cell F2 (PC); CTRL + u (Mac)
Display the Formula Builder after you type a valid function name in a formula CTRL + a (PC and Mac)

Miscellaneous Shortcuts

Here are a few more time-saving shortcuts. To start, here’s a final featured shortcut for managing the size of your Excel worksheet:

Save your work as… Control + Shift + s (PC); Command + Shift + s (Mac)
Open spelling & grammar check F7 (PC and Mac)
Insert a comment (see screenshot below) Shift + F2 (PC and Mac)

Insert a comment in Excel

Want more Excel tips? Check out this list of common Excel error messages and how to fix them.

free excel templates for marketing

The post 43 Handy Excel Shortcuts You Can't Live Without appeared first on Wicked Baron's Emporium.

Many marketers use Microsoft Excel every day, whether it’s to create a chart, analyze data, or run a report to present at the next team meeting.

Creating reports like these in Excel is time-consuming enough. How can we spend a little less time navigating, formatting, selecting, and entering formulas for our data? Wouldn’t it be great if there were keyboard shortcuts that could help us get our work done faster?

So glad you asked.

We’ve put together a list of 43 keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft Excel. Although you can do all of these maneuvers manually, knowing these tricks will help save you time so you can focus on the stuff that really matters.

Click here to download our collection of free Excel templates that will make  your life easier.

All of these shortcuts can be accessed on PC and Mac, so we’ve included both types below where applicable.

(Note for Mac users: To access the F keys (F1–F12), you’ll have to hold the Fn key before pressing any F key — unless you’ve enabled those keys as standard function keys.)

43 Excel Shortcuts You’ll Definitely Want to Bookmark

Navigation Shortcuts

These simple shortcuts can help you navigate between workbooks, sheets, rows and columns:

Move up through a selection Shift + Enter (PC and Mac)
Jump to the top of a column CTRL + ↑ (PC); Command + ↑ (Mac)
Jump to the bottom of a column CTRL + ↓ (PC); Command + ↓ (Mac)
Jump to the corner of a selection (Note: Rotate to each corner by repeating this keystroke) CTRL + . (PC and Mac)
Close the active workbook window CTRL + w (PC); Command + W (Mac)
Switch to previous workbook window CTRL + Shift + F6 (PC); Command + Shift + F6 (Mac)
Switch to the next open worksheet CTRL + Tab (Mac only)
Switch to the previous open worksheet (Mac) CTRL + Shift + Tab (Mac only)
Start a new chart sheet F11 (PC and Mac)
Insert a new sheet Shift + F11 (PC and Mac)
Repeat the last action CTRL + y (PC); Command + Y (Mac)
Fill selected cell with the content in the cell above selected cell CTRL + d (PC and Mac)
Fill selected cell with the content in the cell to the left of selected cell CTRL + r (PC and Mac)

Format Shortcuts

Formatting in Excel can be difficult if you don’t know of what you’re doing. Here are a few shortcuts that to help you easily format your cells. To start, here’s a featured formatting shortcut you might not have known about:

Find and replace values CTRL + F (PC); Command + F (Mac)
Show all values as percentages CTRL + Shift + % (PC and Mac)
Show all values as currency (Note: Replace $ with your own country’s currency key) CTRL + Shift + $ (PC and Mac)
Show all values in general number format CTRL + Shift + ~ (PC and Mac)
Apply or remove bold formatting to selected cells CTRL + 2 (PC); Command + b (Mac)
Apply or remove italic formatting to selected cells CTRL + 3 (PC); Command + i (Mac)
Hide selected rows CTRL + 9 (PC and Mac)
Unhide selected rows CTRL + Shift + ( (PC and Mac)
Hide selected columns CTRL + 0 (PC and Mac)
Unhide selected columns CTRL + Shift + ) (PC and Mac)
Insert current date CTRL + ; (PC and Mac)
Insert current time CTRL + Shift + : (PC); Command + ; (Mac)
Insert a hyperlink CTRL + k (PC); Command + k (Mac)
Apply an outline border to selected cells (see screenshot below) CTRL + Shift + & (PC); Command + Option + 0 (Mac)

Here’s what cells look like with (left) and without (right) a border:

Excel spreadsheet with no border outline Excel spreadsheet with outline border applied around cells

Shortcuts for Selecting Rows & Columns

Save yourself the manual dragging and selecting rows and columns with these handy keyboard tricks. To start, here are two featured rows-related shortcuts you might not have known about:

Expand the selection by one cell either upward (↑) or downward (↓) Shift + ↑ [or] Shift + (PC and Mac)
Expand the selection to the last non-empty cell CTRL + Shift + Arrow Key (PC); Command + Shift + Arrow Key (Mac)
Select entire column CTRL + [spacebar] (PC and Mac)
Select entire row Shift + [spacebar] (PC and Mac)
Select entire sheet CTRL + a (PC); Command + a (Mac)
Select only the visible cells in the current selection Alt + ; (PC); Command + Shift + z (Mac)

Formula Shortcuts

Formulas are a huge part of every marketer’s Excel toolkit. Here are a few shortcuts that’ll make you a formula wiz:

Start a formula (e.g. “=A4+A5”) = (i.e. press the “equals” sign; PC and Mac)
Insert AutoSum formula Alt + (PC); Command + Shift + t (Mac)
Edit active cell F2 (PC); CTRL + u (Mac)
Display the Formula Builder after you type a valid function name in a formula CTRL + a (PC and Mac)

Miscellaneous Shortcuts

Here are a few more time-saving shortcuts. To start, here’s a final featured shortcut for managing the size of your Excel worksheet:

Save your work as… Control + Shift + s (PC); Command + Shift + s (Mac)
Open spelling & grammar check F7 (PC and Mac)
Insert a comment (see screenshot below) Shift + F2 (PC and Mac)

Insert a comment in Excel

Want more Excel tips? Check out this list of common Excel error messages and how to fix them.

free excel templates for marketing

The post 43 Handy Excel Shortcuts You Can't Live Without appeared first on Wicked Baron's Emporium.